Art, blood, shit and other fluids.

I don’t want to be in this situation. I can’t want any harder. And I’m here wondering if people I love will still be alive or in jail tomorrow.

Say hi to George Carlin, Jonathan Winters, Richard Pryor, Andy Kaufman, Greg Giraldo, Lenny Bruce, Hunter S Thompson, Jim Henson and Redd Foxx.

I grew up on the reruns of Mork and Mindy. By ten with Dead Poets Society and Awakenings. Saw Toys in the theater, i recall how psychedelic it seemed and saw war in it. 

My parents were somewhat strict with content but being a this child by 12 I got to rent Shakes The Clown. I think they knew I was an odd kid seeing The Fisher King in the theater and requesting a VHS copy. 

At 18 taken with the dramatic/darker side of his acting. I saw the reflection in him of the depression in What Dreams May Come. Then later One Hour Photo and World’s Greatest Dad. I had loved him as a stand up comedian and come to realize the quality and depth he put into the roles he really wanted.

Thanks for transcending and teaching me part of myself throughout. Upon hearing this news I had no surprise. It was obvious to anyone who could really see. 

From an interview for World’s Greatest Dad

The film is a devastatingly funny indictment of the modern grief industry, but when I ask Williams if he thinks it’s getting worse, he says mildly, “Well, I think people want it. In a weird way, it’s trying to keep hope alive.” So does he not share the film’s judgment on mawkish sentimentality? “Well, you just try and keep it in perspective; you have to remember the best and the worst.” It seems as if he’s about to engage with the question – “In America they really do mythologise people when they die,” he agrees – but then he veers off at a tangent, putting on Ronald Reagan’s voice but talking about the ex-president in the third person: “Maybe he was kind of lovable, but you realised half way through his administration he really didn’t know where he was.”

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/sep/20/robin-williams-worlds-greatest-dad-alcohol-drugs

Say hi to George Carlin, Jonathan Winters, Richard Pryor, Andy Kaufman, Greg Giraldo, Lenny Bruce, Hunter S Thompson, Jim Henson and Redd Foxx.

I grew up on the reruns of Mork and Mindy. By ten with Dead Poets Society and Awakenings. Saw Toys in the theater, i recall how psychedelic it seemed and saw war in it. My parents were somewhat strict with content but being a this child by 12 I got to rent Shakes The Clown. I think they knew I was an odd kid seeing The Fisher King in the theater and requesting a VHS copy. At 18 taken with the dramatic/darker side of his acting. I saw the reflection in him of the depression in What Dreams May Come. Then later One Hour Photo and World’s Greatest Dad. I had loved him as a stand up comedian and come to realize the quality and depth he put into the roles he really wanted. Thanks for transcending and teaching me part of myself throughout. Upon hearing this news I had no surprise. It was obvious to anyone who could really see.

From an interview for World’s Greatest Dad

The film is a devastatingly funny indictment of the modern grief industry, but when I ask Williams if he thinks it’s getting worse, he says mildly, “Well, I think people want it. In a weird way, it’s trying to keep hope alive.” So does he not share the film’s judgment on mawkish sentimentality? “Well, you just try and keep it in perspective; you have to remember the best and the worst.” It seems as if he’s about to engage with the question – “In America they really do mythologise people when they die,” he agrees – but then he veers off at a tangent, putting on Ronald Reagan’s voice but talking about the ex-president in the third person: “Maybe he was kind of lovable, but you realised half way through his administration he really didn’t know where he was.”

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/sep/20/robin-williams-worlds-greatest-dad-alcohol-drugs

nickdrake:

The Story of the Fool and the Fisher King, Told in Central Park

Disillusioned, half-insane ex-medieval history professor and homeless vagrant Parry’s (Robin Williams) telling of the legendary story of the simple-minded Fool and the Fisher King involving the quest for the Holy Grail (the cup from the Last Supper). He was lying naked on his back on the grass in Central Park at night (doing what he called “cloud-busting”), next to despairing, guilt-ridden, suicidally-despondent radio DJ shock-jock Jack Lucas (Jeff Bridges):

It begins with the king as a boy, having to spend the night alone in the forest to prove his courage so he can become the king. Now while he is spending the night alone, he’s visited by a sacred vision. Out of the fire appears the holy grail, symbol of God’s divine grace. And a voice said to the boy, ‘You shall be keeper of the grail so that it may heal the hearts of men.’ But the boy was blinded by greater visions of a life filled with power and glory and beauty. And in this state of radical amazement, he felt for a brief moment not like a boy, but invincible, like God, so he reached into the fire to take the grail, and the grail vanished, leaving him with his hand in the fire to be terribly wounded. Now as this boy grew older, his wound grew deeper. Until one day, life for him lost its reason. He had no faith in any man, not even himself. He couldn’t love or feel loved. He was sick with experience. He began to die.

One day, a Fool wandered into the castle and found the king alone. And being a Fool, he was simple-minded, he didn’t see a king. He only saw a man alone and in pain. And he asked the king: ‘What ails you, friend?’ The king replied: ‘I’m thirsty. I need some water to cool my throat.’ So the Fool took a cup from beside his bed, filled it with water, and handed it to the king. As the king began to drink, he realized his wound was healed. He looked at his hands, and there was the Holy Grail - that which he sought all of his life! He turned to the Fool and said with amazement: ‘How could you find that which my brightest and bravest could not?’ And the Fool replied: ‘I don’t know. I only knew that you were thirsty.’ It’s very beautiful, isn’t it?

RIP Robin…..

butthorn:

When I wanted to kill myself, it was three days before Christmas. I found myself at the hospital, in a room with no windows and a locked door. Sometime well after midnight, a social worker came in. She asked me questions about my history of mental health, my family, friends, work, bowel movements,…

Fuck.

Sorry we miss each other
We miss each sorry other

49 plays

carissasbierd:

they’ll only miss you when you leave - carissa’s weird

Life is beautiful. Really, it is. Full of beauty and illusions. Life is great. Without it, you’d be dead.

andreaarmstrong:

I’ve admired Milt Kobayashi’s work before. This painting is one he did as a demo at the Scottsdale Artists’ School. Click on the picture and you can see the painting super-zoomed-in. Check out the fat white paint on her shoulder, and the thin brushy underpainting of her hair. 
Love it love it love it.

andreaarmstrong:

I’ve admired Milt Kobayashi’s work before. This painting is one he did as a demo at the Scottsdale Artists’ School. Click on the picture and you can see the painting super-zoomed-in. Check out the fat white paint on her shoulder, and the thin brushy underpainting of her hair. 

Love it love it love it.

polly-jean-harvey:

frankieteardrop:

[x]

How fantastic!(this is Polly throwing Nick Cave into a pool btw)

polly-jean-harvey:

frankieteardrop:

[x]

How fantastic!
(this is Polly throwing Nick Cave into a pool btw)

vintageanchorbooks:

Check out this detailed catalog of the music in the work of Haruki Murakami by book: http://haruki-music.com/

misfitsoul:

CBGB OMFUG